About our Daughter

I am mother to four wonderful daughters, ages 17, 19, 21, and 23, and wife to the greatest husband on earth. God has given us a special child to raise one who was diagnosed with early-onset bipolar disorder at the age of seven, though she showed signs of it from the age of fifteen months. She also has ADHD, Sensory Integration Disorder (sensory seeking), Dyslexia, and Non-Verbal Learning Disorder-NOS, all typical comorbidities for a bipolar child. In spite of the trials, she enjoys lacrosse, running (finished her first marathon in October of 2014!), and reading and writing her own books. I will share with you the many joys and sorrows we have faced and will face in the future with the hope that you may find better understanding about this mental illness caused by both chemical and structural abnormalities in the brain. I desire that you will be encouraged by this blog if you are also dealing with a bipolar child. Thank you for reading and sharing in our journey.

How Did You Know She Was Bipolar So Young?

I wrote a long explanation of how we came to this bipolar diagnosis in a child so young under my post of March 19th of 2009. If your child or a child you know bears similarities, please seek out a good psychiatrist and don't wait for "things to get better." Often they will simply get worse, and the longer a child is unmedicated, the more damage their brain can accrue. Early diagnoses and treatment are key to providing these children with a chance at a successful life later as a teen and an adult.
Never change, start or stop a medication without the approval of your child's physician!

Wednesday, January 13, 2010

The Incessant Talking Part

I don't know if this is true for your bipolar child, but from what I have read in all the literature, "pressured speech" is characteristic of these kids. I am not really sure what pressured speech looks like, but for Caroline, it is perhaps the ability to talk non-stop about topics on which she is an expert, and perhaps then some. She will talk for minutes on end without picking up on any cues from her audience that they are 1. bored 2. busy or 3. doubting the veracity of her statements. This is really quite a social problem for her, as I have observed. I know another bipolar adult fairly well who has this same problem. They will not get the clue that their turn is over in the conversation and wait to hear what the other person has to say. And, they will skip so quickly from subject to subject that you don't realize they are on a completely different topic until you realize that you are completely confused as to what they are talking about now. Caroline does this, and maybe this is the result of the "racing thoughts" or her ADHD. I don't know but it is one of the more annoying penchants she has. We love her though, and even if half her stories are tall tales, we will still listen. We may question her a little, probe the facts here and there, but still listen.

9 comments:

Vampi said...

When I'm manic, I do have that problem. I don't realize I'm doing it until I realize my husband is looking very amused, having listened to me talk about 5 different topics within a 10 minute span.... lol

Megan said...

Yes, it does make us chuckle too!

Corrie Howe said...

It might also be a girl thing. My daughter can talk, and talk, and talk. One day she was just prattling away. I looked in the review mirror to see one brother reading a book. One brother listening to his iPod and the other one asleep. I knew I wasn't listening to her and my husband wasn't either. "Faith, who are you talking to?" She said, "I don't know."

Interestingly enough, Jonathan, was listening while he was reading.

Megan said...

Yes, and with four girls in our home my poor husband gets an earful!!

linea said...

Like Vampi, I too can totally have this problem when I am manic. I just get so excited about things that I can just go on and on. I find myself moving from topic to topic as if this grand idea is about to form that will in some way incorporate all of my random thoughts. My sister, on the other hand, is not bipolar, and she does this anyways:) Maybe it is a girl thing. My parents tell a story about how she talked for almost three hours straight on a car trip without them even uttering a word!

Megan said...

Yes, girls can talk, and with four of them in our house, our home is NEVER quiet unless they are all gone.

Miss Emily said...

I do it without being manic (then again I'm BP2 so I don't ever get true mania. I might be a rapid cycler or something. Who knows. But I do this often.

lisa said...

glad I found you all! My 11 year old son has severe ADHD and Bi-polar disorder. he was diagnosed with ADHD at 4 and Bi-polar at 8. We have run through the gamut of meds over the years. he could never tolerate stimulants -although his focus increased and he was less hyperactive, he became very depressed. Since then, we have tried it all. He has now been on Intuniv for 3 days and alos takes 15mg of Abilfy in the morning. He has sleep troubles often so takes 3 mg of clonodine at bedtime and xanax as needed. We are really hoping the Intuniv helps with ADHD symptoms. he is a bright, funny, creative kid but lacks impulse control, talks non stop and cannot sit still. He started having problems keeping up in school in the 4th grade and enters 6th in the fall. This past year has been really rough with an increase in sneaking around, lying at times and just generally not thinking things through to consequences. I know it is too soon to tell if the Intuniv will help but he sure has been sleepy! I have read here that is not uncommon at first. I would appreciate any support, suggestions and community I can find out here! Thanks so much. Lisa-mom of Merrick!

Megan said...

Hi Lisa, I am glad you found me. Sounds like you have been through it all right. Intuniv can be a great non-stimulant ADHD drug. Our dd who is bipolar can't take any stimulants at all. Let me know how your son does on Intuniv. I understand about the falling behind in school even though they are so bright. Bipolar disorder and ADHD have a way of interfering with their academics. I hate that part. We held our dd back one year when depakote made her so dopey she missed half a year of school.